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General Information

Common Questions

Can't I just take an antibiotic to make the infection go away instead of doing root canal treatment?

Unfortunately, no. While antiobiotic therapy remains an important adjunct to root canal treatment, it will not result in resolution of endodontic infection. Endodontic infection is due to bacteria within the pulp of a tooth. Due to  anatomical limitations, antibiotics taken systemically may concentrate in the bone around a tooth, but they cannot enter into a tooth where the source of infection lies. Thus, usage of antibiotics may result in a short-term decrease of pain and/or swelling due to endodontic infection. Long-term resolution of endodontic infection, however, can only be attained via definitive treatment to remove the infected pulp within a tooth. That is, either by extraction of the tooth or endodontic treatment to preserve the tooth.


Why must I return to my dentist to have a permanent restoration placed?

Upon the completion of endodontic treatment, a temporary filling is commonly placed to seal the tooth from the top. This is done to allow easier access into the tooth should it be necessary to re-enter the tooth once endodontic treatment has been completed. Once an adequate period of time has elapsed after the completion of endodontic treatment during which the tooth has remained asymptomatic, your dentist can then proceed to place the permanent restoration to seal the tooth long-term.


Is endodontic treatment painful?

With today's modern techniques, local anesthetics, and the special skills of an endodontist, your endodontic therapy should be painless. If at any point you feel discomfort during your treatment, be sure to let Dr. Chamorro or his assistants know. We are committed to ensuring that your visit to our office be as pleasant as possible. For those patients who may be especially anxious, we do offer oral and nitrous oxide conscious sedation.


Myths About Root Canal Treatment

What is Focal Infection?